Showing posts with label Future of Learning. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Future of Learning. Show all posts

Friday, April 3, 2020

Future of Learning and Role of MOOCs in 2025

Future of Learning
More computers and cheaper bandwidth will come with the future. This one is a no-brainer because it is an extrapolation of one of the clearest developments in the technological revolution — consistent and rapid development. This ensures that the internet and the devices accessing it will continue to expand faster, cheaper, and in more locations. Technology reshapes the way we teach, links classrooms and shakes up the education industry's basic business model.

Learn From Anywhere:
Massive open online courses, or MOOCs, in which the professor leads a course via online video lectures with a large number of students, have possibly been the biggest higher education story in recent years. And it will continue to be. MOOCs intend to reshape a variety of facets of the education market. They may not have lived up to the initial expectations as other educational institutes were supposed to be left out of business. But they are making a huge shift. MOOCs revived interest in online learning and encouraged colleges to introduce new technologies to keep up with it. In addition to their conventional offerings, many prestigious universities and selective colleges such as Harvard, MIT and Stanford are adding MOOCs. As a result, higher education chief information officers also need to extend learning management frameworks including dissertation help providers to enable functions similar to MOOCs. The choice to use a cloud solution may be less costly and lower risk. It is the future.

Professional Development:
Many have suggested that MOOCs may help improve the work market for individuals – anyone taking a course and earning a credential from a course taught by a world-class professor may have an edge in looking for a job. I am not entirely sure this would be the case – some kind of permanent standardized course content record and official qualifications for courses between various MOOC platforms would be required for a MOOC to bear greater weight with potential employers. But MOOCs would seem to play a logical role in professional development in the workplace, particularly when teams take a course together in a workplace. Student learning and the value to the employer will come from interacting from working colleagues taking the same course and other online students interested in the same course experience.

The MOOC's goals are transformed from basic skills or expertise acquisition to application of professional perspectives and analysis in your workplace. Again, for a shorter MOOC experience targeted at working adults coping with specific types of issues in their workplace, an "off the shelf" course taught at a university may not be sufficient. To faculty developing a short-form course that looks at a more focused field, free of departmental or programmatic objectives, maybe a refreshing break from the traditional university teaching experience and allow for more in-depth experimentation than a conference presentation or short workshop.

Supplementing Secondary Education:
MOOCs can be a way for universities to deliver high-quality, self-paced courses at a low cost to students to meet these needs. Although the MOOC model is not suitable for high stakes, credit testing or individual instructor assistance, a MOOC targeted at high school students may be supplemented by school teachers who offer support and guidance as they go through the process. Here MOOCs have the ability not only to help incoming college students excel but also to give prospective applicants a taste of the teaching style of a specific university. More significantly, it could help high school teachers move their resources into core courses at their school and allow them to work in fresh, creative ways with students as mentors and coaches.

Redesigned Classrooms:
When MOOCs broaden virtual education, other developments are based on conventional classrooms being modernized. In many International Universities, there are "Flipped" classrooms — where students watch lectures at home so they can perform homework- activities during classroom time. The aim is to allow students to study at home at their own pace so that teachers can spend more quality time. Early findings showed that the flipped classrooms would boost efficiency. Enhanced, virtual reality technology with smart glasses would further change the classroom.

The world of MOOCs is moving quickly – eventually, we will all move from projects to applying what we've learned to higher education problems. In our reviews of MOOCs over the past few months, I'm persuaded that the areas we need to tackle aren't with technology or even simple pedagogy, but in adapting the MOOC model to the most important needs universities need to tackle for students and building the institutional energy to create strategic collaborations to solve those issues.